Mu Shu Seitan with Homemade Hot Mustard

Mu Shu Seitan

with Homemade Hot Mustard

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Mu Shu anything is a staple of Chinese-American restaurants and has been for at least 40 years. Here we’ve made it quicker, tastier, and generally better. We use seitan for protein, prunes—a definite improvement over ketchup-like hoisin—and flour tortillas, which, when warmed up, are a fine alternative to making and cooking pancake batter. There’s plenty of lovely winter produce in there too, including dried shiitakes, an especially handy pantry staple found year-round.

Asian High-Protein Fruit Dinner Leafy Greens Fall Recipes Seitan Winter Recipes
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SERVINGS
2
PREP & COOK TIME
35 min
CALORIES
625
FAT
21g
CARBOHYDRATES
69g
PROTEIN
43g

MAIN INGREDIENTS

  1. 1/2 ounce dried Shiitake mushrooms
  2. 8 ounces seitan
  3. 1 tablespoon tamari
  4. 1 1/2 teaspoons Mirin
  5. 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  6. 3/4 pound savoy cabbage
  7. 4 ounces carrots
  8. 1 celery stalk
  9. Fresh ginger
  10. 2 garlic cloves
  11. 2 tablespoons vegetable oil*
  12. 2 tablespoons dry mustard
  13. Salt*
  14. 4 pitted prunes
  15. 2 scallions
  16. Pepper*
  17. 4 flour tortillas
  18. *not included

INSTRUCTIONS

1
Heat the oven to 400°F. Put 1 1/2 cups water in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil. Put the mushrooms in a small bowl, pour over enough boiling water to cover them by 1 inch, and let sit; reserve the rest of the boiling water. Thinly slice the seitan and put it in a medium bowl. Add the tamari, mirin, and sesame oil and toss to coat.
2
Rinse and trim the cabbage and carrots; peel the carrots. Shred the cabbage and grate the carrots either by hand or in a food processor. Rinse, trim, and thinly slice the celery. Peel the ginger and chop it with the garlic.
3
Put 5 teaspoons vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When it’s hot, add the ginger and garlic and cook until they’re fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the cabbage, carrots, celery, and 2 tablespoons of the mushroom soaking water to the pan. Cook, tossing and adding more mushroom water 1 tablespoon at a time as necessary to prevent sticking, until the celery and cabbage begin to soften, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove the mushrooms from the water and slice the caps thinly; reserve the water.
4
Whisk together the mustard powder, 2 tablespoons of the boiling water, and the remaining 1 teaspoon vegetable oil in a small bowl. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt. Rinse, trim, and chop the scallions. Chop the prunes.
5
Wrap the tortillas in foil and put them in the oven until they’re warm, 5 to 10 minutes. Add the sliced mushrooms, seitan, and marinade to the skillet along with 1/4 cup of the reserved mushroom soaking water. Cook, stirring frequently until most of the liquid has evaporated, 8 to 10 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning. To serve, heap the mu shu on a platter and pass the tortillas, scallions, prunes, and hot mustard sauce on the side. To eat, spread a little mustard sauce on a tortilla, fill it with mu shu, sprinkle with scallions and prunes, and fold or roll to enclose the filling.